Philosophy

Binda has become acquainted with the age old eastern tradition of yoga meditation . This mystical doctrine teaches the communion of the human soul with the Creator. Meditation causes inner changes in him and he becomes more focus in his work. Painting now becomes a conscious journey to the unknown. More so than many others, he understands the importance of working towards the unconscious as much as possible. He is entranced by the mysterious interaction between intellect and emotions. Both elements play a role in painting, but it is a role that will always remain elusive. He has no need to fix it rationally, however, for it is actually this mystery that inspires him.

?When I paint, I?m searching for something unknown. You make a journey where you don?t know what you will meet. You let your intuition guide you and you must be open, or else the journey will be difficult. The instinctive and the intellectual are in harmony.
What you experience first is the emotion, what you would like to set on paper. In that first stage I am guided intuitively by the interplay of shape , image and colour. Reality is not important at all. .The conceptual comes into play only after that, for instance, composition, perspective, colour harmony, which are intellectual aspects to a certain astounded. It is an interaction.
If you were to do away with one, you wouldn?t be able to make a journey. Intuitive action means using your abilities automatically, spontaneously, without thinking about it. That only came later
At first I wasn?t aware of it. I?ve been meditating for years now, and that has certainly influenced my work..I have started thinking more consciously, also about the universe.?

Binda?s paintings reflect his dedication to the values of Hinduism. He avoids exciting, brightly coloured dramas on canvas and instead, produces calm works, often with delicate, translucent colours, almost uniform shades. His work develops instinctively, nevertheless from a concept on which he spends much time. He explores the theme with all his senses, and then elaborates on it in a series of paintings, sometimes lasting for years.

One or two colours appear as a spontaneous start on the canvas, and he then immediately adds large areas to it. Additional use of colours follows the theme. This method has developed throughout the years and enhances his possibilities for spontaneity: shapes and structures appear in the colour areas, which he gratefully incorporates in the development of the work.

Anand Binda?s artistic calling is meaningful: it is the manner he has chosen to re-create the world around him. He gives it shape in such a way that it can give joy to his fellow human beings, and thus he gives expression to humankind?s natural longing for the sublime.
Chandra van Binnendijk.